The words written on this site do not necessarily reflect the fews of St. Mary's Catholic Church.

1st October 2010

Photoset

The celebration of the sacrament of Confirmation at St. Mary’s— September 30, 2010

1st October 2010

Photoset

The celebration of the sacrament of Confirmation at St. Mary’s— September 30, 2010

1st October 2010

Photoset with 1 note

The celebration of the sacrament of Confirmation at St. Mary’s— September 30, 2010

1st October 2010

Photoset with 1 note

The celebration of the sacrament of Confirmation at St. Mary’s— September 30, 2010

29th September 2010

Post

What is Faith?

http://www.usccb.org/nab/100310.shtml

   In the Second Letter from Paul to the Corinthians, we can find the line “we walk by faith and not by sight.”  This is an ironic statement in a way because faith is not something that be cannot be directly seen by the human eye.  Of course anyone can make a case that you can ‘see’ faith in other ways, but faith is the great intangible part of being a Catholic.

   The word faith is tossed around a lot and can represent different things.  But in it’s essence faith can be equated to trust.  If someone says to you “have faith,” your question could be “in what?”  Having faith shows you trust, or believe, in something or someone.  Take our American currency for example.  “In God we trust” can be found on every coin and dollar bill.  It was made our national motto in 1956 through an act of Congress and affirmation by President Eisenhower.  During the time of the Cold War, Congress stated “as long as this country trusts in God, it will prevail.”  In other words, if the people of the United States have faith in God, we will rise above any adversity.  So we can see that faith can be equated to trust. 

   The readings this week basically encourage us to have faith in God.  Through hard times and good times, God is there for us as our strength.  If we have this faith in God, we should not be worried about troubles that may come our way.  As in the first reading, it is a natural human reaction to pray to God more in times of trouble.  “The just one, because of his faith, shall live,” we hear.  Faith can save us from despair. 

   But having this faith is not always easy.  In the second reading, Paul is writing to Timothy to maintain his faith and be strong for the purpose of his ministry.  Using the strength God gives us can get us through the hardships which come with living out the Gospel.  Paul chooses an interesting line to encourage Timothy to keep up his ministry.  He tells him to “stir into the flame the gift of God.”  To stir, in this case, to rouse something and what he’s hoping Timothy will do is take the spark of faith within him and make it a burning fire.  Our faith can be like a flame which needs to be fed to grow.

   Faith should not be looked at based on size though.  Even the smallest amount of faith can bring forth good things.  When the Apostles prompt Jesus to “increase our faith,” Jesus talks them through another lesson as to why they have asked the wrong question again.  Faith is not measured by size.  If we are to be good Catholics, we need to have faith in God and expect nothing in return, as Jesus teaches.  We are servants of the Lord, put on this Earth to do God’s work.  We cannot expect to be re-paid for our faith, but in an ironic twist, if we have faith in God during our lives, we trust that we will be among His chosen ones in His kingdom.

25th September 2010

Post with 1 note

What’s Around You?

Readings for the week of September 26, 2010

http://www.usccb.org/nab/092610.shtml

Walking around a modern day college campus, countless students can be seen listening to their iPods or talking on their cell phones.  While walking around, they can shut off the world around them.  Sometimes they do not even acknowledge other people who speak to them as they walk by.  We all are guilty of this to some extent— being shut off the world around us.

In the first reading this week, those living in Zion are warned about the lives they are living.  As life flies by, they enjoy the lavish things such as drinking the good wine or anointing themselves with expensive oils.  They are unsuspecting and unaware of what will happen when the life they are living comes to an end.  The Lord says they will be the first to go into exile when the time comes.  

The same message can be seen in the Gospel from Luke.  As the rich folk are eating heartily, a poor man, Lazarus, lays outside their door hoping for a few scraps of food.  As they ignore him day by day, they are unaware, just as those living in Zion, of the ‘punishment’ they will receive later on.  After both men died, Lazarus sits at the side of Abraham with the angels and the rich man is sent to the netherworld.  As he looks up, he sees the good eternal life that Lazarus, he gets upset about his circumstance.  During a conversation with Abraham, he finally realizes the faults of his day and asks Abraham to warns his relatives of the horrors that they will eventually face.  He claims his family will only change if one from the dead is there to warn them.  However, they have had many warnings before and they do not need another.

The second reading to Timothy ties it all together for us today.  If we live our lives keeping God’s commandments, we will live good lives in both this life and the next.  We have to read the signs around us as ways that we can improve our lives.  This doesn’t mean we necessarily have to live like Lazarus.  We, especially in America, are very fortunate to have just about everything we could ever need plus a number of things we want.  What these readings are doing for us is providing us with our warning to be awake and alert to all of our surroundings, help those that need it as much as we can, and live lives that reflect the life of Jesus each day.  Can’t say we weren’t warned. 

Tagged: Readings

8th April 2010

Post

Bulletin

This week’s bulletin has been posted on our website.  go to http://stmarysdover.org

Tagged: St. Mary's church

5th April 2010

Quote with 2 notes

Being Christian is not the result of an ethical choice or a lofty idea, but the encounter with an event, a person, which gives life a new horizon and a decisive direction.
— Pope Benedict XVI- Deus Caritas Est, Dec. 25, 2005

Tagged: Pope Benedict XVIChristianity

4th April 2010

Photo with 1 note

St. Mary’s Church Easter Sunday Morning

St. Mary’s Church Easter Sunday Morning

Tagged: EasterSt. Mary's Church

4th April 2010

Post with 1 note

Happy Easter!